Technology, Humanities and Apple

Ten years ago I got my first iBook. After reading ‘Becoming Steve Jobs’ I decided to share why I am an Apple fan. Apple is not flawless and Steve Jobs was not born a great leader. On the contrary, he failed big time, but he learned from his mistakes. Apple embrace diversity and equality, because ‘inclusion inspires innovation’.

Taking Fear Seriously

In the aftermaths of the terrorist attack in Paris and the security threats in Brussels, reading Kahneman has struck me as timely insightful to further comprehend the way fear works; due to the attacks and threats as well as the disturbing spill-over effects it has had on immigration and racism.

Freedom, Disguised as a Boy

I just read a fascinating book, telling the story of parents in Afghanistan raising their daughters up until puberty disguised as boys, in a ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ manner. At first glance this is about how families with only daughters can gain the societal status and pride that comes with having sons. A closer look it is more to it.

Too Slow for Fast Populism?

Reading Kahneman’s ‘Thinking, Fast and Slow’ (2011) has helped me to better understand how come human rights lobbyists in the European Union (like me) – despite our solid arguments – often lose against populists and eurosceptics that seemingly effortlessly glamour voters with their simplistic rhetorics and appealing emotions.